Housing 2019: May timetables Green Paper implementation

PM tells conference the plan will be released in September.

theresa-may-ii

Theresa May has told Housing 2019 that the implementation plan for the Social Housing Green Paper will be released in September.

The PM also pitched the prospect of new regulations as part of the plan.

May told conference that “hand in hand, step by step and piece by piece” the government and the sector have begun to turn the housing crisis around.

“With the number of affordable housing starts been increasing year-on-year to the extent that, by this autumn, latest projections pitch a million homes added to the national supply in less than five years.

“The housing shortage in this country began not because of a blip lasting one year or one Parliament, but because not enough homes were built over many decades.

The very worst thing we could do would be to make the same mistake again.

So while it has taken a huge effort to get this far, we are only just getting started,” she said.

CIH chief executive Terrie Alafat welcomed the September date saying it was vital to maintain momentum with the paper covering issues that have a “critical effect” on the lives of millions of people.

Much of May’s speech was devoted to design standards and a defence of her legacy on housing.

We agree with the Prime Minister that the new homes we build should be of the highest quality, with the space people need.

“But for millions of our fellow citizens the key issue is that they simply cannot afford a home at all,” said Alafat.

“More than 60%of people we asked in a recent survey said they never expected to be able to buy a home, and 20% doubted they’d even be able to rent one.

The Social Housing Green Paper was initially released last August, as a response to the Grenfell disaster.

“We agree with the Prime Minister that the new homes we build should be of the highest quality, with the space people need.

“But for millions of our fellow citizens the key issue is that they simply cannot afford a home at all.

More than 60 per cent of people we asked in a recent survey said they never expected to be able to buy a home, and 20 per cent doubted they’d even be able to rent one,” said Alafat.

“The Prime Minister is right when she says there is more – a lot more – that still needs to be done to turn commitment into reality,” she said.

At conference yesterday, a sector coalition – including CIH –  set out in detail the need for a ten-year programme to build around 1.5 million social homes to rent, as well as shared ownership properties to buy.

This was costed at £12.8bn  billion a year to add around £120 billion to the economy every year.

Shadow Housing Secretary John Healey said he found May’s speech “sad (with) so little to show for three years in Downing Street.”

To Habinteg CEO Sheron Carter it was “vital” that any new design standards include accessibility for older and disabled people.

“Our recent accessible homes forecast revealed that, shockingly, only 1% of planned homes outside of London will be suitable for wheelchair users,” said Cater.

“Currently only 7% of homes in England have even the most basic access features so we really need all new housing to offer good levels of accessibility and adaptability if we’re to get anywhere near meeting the needs of our whole population.

“Too many disabled and older people are making do in homes that are just not suitable for them,” she said.

Similar stories by tag

Comments